Multi contrast image merge using layers

Comments and discussions about 8bf plugins which can be use in various applications like Photoshop, Paint Shop Pro or Photo-Paint
Richard

Multi contrast image merge using layers

Postby Richard » Sat Oct 25, 2003 12:35 am

Is ther a plug-in that would enable the merging of varying contrast images of the same subject - something that would enable the production of wider range final images.

Richard

HaraldHeim
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Postby HaraldHeim » Sun Oct 26, 2003 12:07 pm

Combining photos of the same scene with different exposure values is a good method for avoiding blown highlights and suppressed shadows. It usually produces a better result that adjusting the highlights and shadows of only one photo. For this technique you should use a tripod, so that you don't have to manually adjust the photos to make them match.

You can combine the photos with different exposure time in Photoshop by placing them on different layers. You can blend them together with various blending options or you can create a mask for each layer to mask out the badly exposed areas.

For a plugin that does this, look at http://www.reindeergraphics.com/optipix ... lend.shtml

Keith Richardson

Re: Multi contrast image merge using layers

Postby Keith Richardson » Wed Nov 19, 2003 11:03 am

Richard wrote:Is ther a plug-in that would enable the merging of varying contrast images of the same subject - something that would enable the production of wider range final images.

Richard


I needed to do something like this recently, where I was given a photograph with half of the person's face in full sunshine and the othert half in shadow. the line ran diagonally across the face.
I scanned it, then placed it onto successive layers in PSP8.
I hid all others and concentrated at first on the shadowed portion, adjusting the lightness-darkness and contrast and just about anything else that seemed to help to make the shadowed segment look good with adequate detail. I then hid this layer (calling it 'Shadow').
I then did the same for a second layer (called 'Light') but got the sunlit portion as good as possible.
I then selectively revealed each of the respective layers until the final composite contained the best of both worlds. The result was OK.
Being critical, however, the tonal quality ('white-balance'?) did show a hiccup at the junction points of original light/shadow intersection, but friends still said 'great' - just being kind though I am sure!
Hope this helps?


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