Photo restoration

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Robsmom
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Photo restoration

Postby Robsmom » Wed Sep 27, 2006 7:39 pm


HaraldHeim
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Postby HaraldHeim » Wed Sep 27, 2006 10:20 pm

There is a plugin for more or less automatically removing scratches and such things from photos (see ) . But I don't think it does a better job than removing these things manually. It just saves time.

Other than that I guess you can try to improve your skill in this direction. If one image doesn't turn out as it should, try again maybe with other techniques.

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Postby plugsnpixels » Wed Sep 27, 2006 10:49 pm

See examples of Retoucher . Akvis also makes .

Alien Skin's works in a similar manner.

Polaroid made a free Dust & Scratch Removal plug-in (at least for Mac). I don't have samples posted yet, but it was great for removing black or white dust. It's no longer offered, but someone can send it to you if you wish.
Free digital imaging ezine (and discounted plug-ins!)
www.plugsandpixels.com

RonBoyd
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Re: Photo restoration

Postby RonBoyd » Sat Sep 30, 2006 6:00 pm


WandaLea2003
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Photo Restoration, Rob's Mom

Postby WandaLea2003 » Sat Sep 30, 2006 7:45 pm

WandaLea2003

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Postby DeborahD » Sat Sep 30, 2006 10:25 pm


HaraldHeim
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Postby HaraldHeim » Sun Oct 01, 2006 12:39 am


SteveBradford
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Postby SteveBradford » Sun Oct 01, 2006 1:08 am


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Postby RonBoyd » Sun Oct 01, 2006 1:23 am


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Postby WandaLea2003 » Sun Oct 01, 2006 1:36 am

WandaLea2003

scw1217
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Postby scw1217 » Sun Oct 01, 2006 1:39 pm

I will not get into the Photoshop - Paint Shop debate other than to say I have always used Photoshop for photo restorations. However, as to doing the restorations, I would caution against using any "quick fixes" that purport to remove dust and scratches in one easy sweep.

When I got into photo restorations, I first visited a professional organization that did such and watched their methods and asked questions. So what I have always done is what I saw them do, and being as they were paid (and handsomely I might add) for restorations, it seemed to me the way to go.

First of all, when I scan in the photo or slide, I try to get the best quality scan I can. The more detail you have to start with the easier problems are to fix. Secondly, be prepared to take your time! Never, never try to rush. A good photo restoration only comes when you slow down and pay attention to what needs to be done.

That said, I primarily use a combination of Photoshop's Clone tool and the Healing brush. When you are cloning, esp. when its a large area or a long scratch, pay attention to the direction of what you are copying. For instance, if it is a background window frame, then follow the vertical direction of the frame. Use the proper sized brush and alternate your source clone frequently to avoid obvious cloning errors. I find cloning easier on black & white photos. So if you are doing a color image, you must also pay attention to the shade of what your "source" is.

Also, zoom way in. Never try to clone from "full screen" because you cannot possibly see all the detail there is to fix. By zooming in you can fix details impossible to spot when zoomed out and you will see dust spots, etc. that you did not know were there. It WILL make a difference if you fix them. You will also avoid using brushes that are too large and cloning over detail you should have saved. I should point out also, that I never use 100% opacity either. I will change the opacity depending on what I am trying to clone. I find the cloning blends in much better when you use less opacity.

Photoshop's healing brush is great for smoothing over dust spots and blending in your cloning, esp. when it involves areas of color. I could NOT have gotten good restorations without it. And here's a hint I picked up from the pros. They often didn't use cloning at all but painted instead. They would do this on a layer and then add film grain adjusting it to match the original photograph. That knowledge has often been invaluable to me. This will obviously not work on facial images or fine detail but is great for large background areas.

All of that said, the best place to ask questions about how to fix photos is at There are obviously way more things to do or not to do than I can possibly put in this one post, but these are the basis of how to properly get started.

Florida, USA

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photo restoration

Postby e_dee » Sun Oct 01, 2006 5:05 pm

To Robsmom:
I have Pspro 7,9,X ,Corel Photo Paint and Adobe Elements and many plugins. I have many very old photos and mostly use Adobe Elements for restoring them. Many need a lot of work due to fading, scratching and dirt and Elements handles it all. The cost of Elements is very reasonable.

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Postby SteveBradford » Sun Oct 01, 2006 7:48 pm

Just to clarify a couple of points raised above:

scw1217: ‘First of all, when I scan in the photo or slide, I try to get the best quality scan I can. The more detail you have to start with the easier problems are to fix.’

Obviously, this is sound practice but: the most common original source in photo restoration is from a print, and scanning a typical print beyond 600dpi is mostly a waste of resources simply because of the limited grain size of the original print emulsion. At 1200 or 2400 you don’t get anything more, other than a huge digital file size. Scanning a negative or transparency at high resolution is another matter altogether because of the much finer grain size. This website (and many others) explain the subject well:
http://www.scantips.com/basics08.html

WandaLea2003: ‘I surely wouldn't call Photoshop's clone application a 'rubber stamp.'

Me and Photoshop go back a long way and ‘Rubber Stamp’ is what Adobe always called their clone tool. I guess Deke McClelland’s constant criticism of what a daft name this was for such a powerful tool finally went home and Adobe has, for once, followed everyone else and settled on ‘Clone Stamp’ in CS2.
Its icon always was, and still is, a Rubber Stamp.

Regards, Steve :wink:

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Postby WandaLea2003 » Tue Oct 03, 2006 5:13 am

Dear Rob's Mom,

I was just reading some of the replys to your question, and there's some great answers on there. I'm sure you've already been helped by some of them. Regardless of whatever product you choose to go with practice is the most important part of photo restorations. Read lots of tutorials. There are a lot of them on the web, and keep practicing.

I just want to say, "Good luck to you, and God bless!"
WandaLea2003

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Postby Robsmom » Wed Oct 04, 2006 3:56 pm

I have not been able to check back on my question for a few days as I had to rush Hubby off to the hospital with breathing problems....the 3rd time in 6 weeks. Anyway, now he is home again and hoping he will stay for longer this time.
Found the answers here so interesting, so much information, so many tips, I am printing them out so I can study them carefully. I have checked out some of the links already. I have PSP 8,9 and X so am not thinking too much about getting PS at this time. I did fool around with one photo I am having problems with in X, which I use most, in 8 and did have better results on that one. I doubt I can ever learn all that PSP can do, it seems to have limitless possibilities!
I also have Picassa and am thinking of deleting that one. Looked at Paint.net and wondering if I would really get more from that than PSP..
Right now, I am going to explore PSP more, look for some sites offering photo mani[ulation tips in PSP. Find out what cmyk and the rgb, whatever , means... channels? yes, I am pretty green in this stuff.
Thank you all for your information, I have lots of time, so I am going to see what I can learn from you... Thanks again, Robsmom :)

Robsmom
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Postby Robsmom » Wed Oct 04, 2006 4:08 pm

I have now read the scan tips. Most of the photos I have were scanned by some one else and sent to me by e mail. The photos I have are just prints from the corner drug store processing, or some my mother took with her old Kodak Brownie she developed herself. The negatives are no longer to be found. Hugs from Robsmom

jackie4
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retouching old pictures?

Postby jackie4 » Wed Jan 17, 2007 6:51 pm

I have psp 8.10 and it took me a while to redo pictures with scratches, it takes alot of practice and I found tutors to help me. You might like to find them and see if it helps you any.


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