Blending


There are two blending controls at the bottom of the Main tab sheet. They are aimed at blending the image passed by graphics application to the HyperTyle plugin with the "texture layer" produced by HyperTyle itself in many different fashions. The combo box control lets you select between 20 different blending modes and the slider right of it lets you select the blending ratio.

A slider value of 255 means that the texture layer is only shown, a slider value of 0 shows only the image, whereas a value of 128 blends the image and texture layer by 50:50.

So as the function of the slider may become fairly obvious when using it, the different blending modes are explained more detailed. If your graphics application supports layers, you may have already come across blending modes and know them. Anyway, we will still discuss them here. The blending modes which are supported by HyperTyle are very similar to those used in Photoshop. But HyperTyle has also some additional ones not available in Photoshop.


Normal

This is not a special blending mode, but the default setting. It doesn't do any special blending (at a slider value of 255), but just lets the texture layer reside above the image and hide the image. However, you can still use the slider to blend the texture layer and the image.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer (Slider at 255)
Blending Result at a value of 128

The third image shows the "normal" blending of the two first images at a blending ratio of 128.

 

Dissolve

At a slider value of 255 you will see no difference between Normal and Dissolve. If you drag the slider towards zero you will see the texture layer slowly dissolve with random noise and reveal the underlying image.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer (Slider at 255)
Blending Result at a value of 128

 


Threshold

Threshold removes portions of the texture layer and reveals the underlying image by using the brightness values of the image. The image is slowly revealed when dragging the slider from 255 towards 0.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer (Slider at 255)
Blending Result at a value of 128

 


Threshold 2

Threshold 2 is similar to Threshold. It removes parts of the texture layer and reveals the underlying image, but uses the brightness values of the texture layer itself. The image is slowly revealed when dragging the slider from 255 towards 0.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer (Slider at 255)
Blending Result at a value of 128



Multiply

Multiply simply blends the image and texture layer by multiplying and dividing the pixel values. As an effect the blending result always looks a bit dark at a slider value of 255. Dragging the slider to 128 for example, removes the darkness, but also weakens the effect a bit. But you can also use the Brightness or Gamma sliders from the Adjust tab sheet to make the blended image brighter.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer
Blending Result at a value of 255

Screen

Screen could be considered an inversion of the Multiply method, because it tends to make the blending result overexposed. As always you can use the blending ratio slider or the Brightness or Gamma sliders from the Adjust tab to weaken the brightness.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer
Blending Result at a value of 255


Overlay

Compared to Multiply and Screen the Overlay blending mode does not produce any brightness change in the blended image. Nevertheless it tends to raise saturation a bit. Adjusting the blending ratio slider to 128 can compensate this disadvantage. Anyway, Overlay is a useful blending mode as it lets you create painted-like effects when blending a texture over a photo. Pressing the Grayscale button from the Texture tab sheet preserves the original colors of the image.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer
Blending Result at a value of 255

 

Soft Light

As its name already tells, the Soft Light blending method creates a soft result. It produces a good looking and is very useful for combining similar images.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer
Blending Result at a value of 255


Hard Light

Hard Light is similar to Soft Light, but generates a result with more contrast. Hard Light produces a very nice effect, too, and can be used for painted-like effects. Pressing the Grayscale button from the Texture tab sheet preserves the original colors of the image.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer
Blending Result at a value of 255

 

Dodge

Dodge creates an even more overexposed result than Screen. That can be helpful when blending a dark image. It can also be used to create a washed out look.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer
Blending Result at a value of 255


Burn

Burn creates the impression of a burned photo which was darkened with soot. This can create a quite atmospheric look which can be adjusted with the blend ratio slider or the Brightness and Gamma sliders from the Adjust tab sheet.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer
Blending Result at a value of 255

 

Darken

Darken replaces the light area of the image with the texture layer and leaves the dark areas of the image untouched.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer
Blending Result at a value of 255


Lighten

Lighten replaces the dark area of the image with the texture layer and leaves the light areas of the image untouched.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer
Blending Result at a value of 255

Exclusion

Replaces parts of the image with an negative version of the texture layer. Adjusting the blend ratio slider to 128 leaves a gray haze on the image which can sometimes look nice.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer
Blending Result at a value of 255

 

Difference

Difference just calculates the pixel value difference between the image and texture layer. This usually results in a colorful, dark and negative image. Adjusting the blend ratio slider to 128 looks like dirt was placed on the image.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer
Blending Result at a value of 255


NegDif 1

A negative version of the Difference method. It produces a bright negative image.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer
Blending Result at a value of 255

 

NegDif 2

Another Negative Difference variation with a less colorful negative result.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer
Blending Result at a value of 255


Subtract

Subtract simply subtracts pixel values of the texture layer from the image. This usually results in very dark, underexposed images.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer
Blending Result at a value of 255

 

Add

Add simply adds pixel values of the texture layer to the image. It creates an overexposed look.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer
Blending Result at a value of 255

 

Expose

Expose usually creates an blended image with more intense colors or with false colors. To soften the effect drag the blending slider to a value below 255. Setting the Texture Map to one of the Gray options removes the false coloring and reveals a painted-like look.

Image (Slider at 0)
Texture Layer
Blending Result at a value of 255